Our top picks of exhibitions together with cultural spaces and places, both online and in the real world.


All, Art, Auctions, Exhibitions, Travel & Hospitality, Initiatives

Viewing There’s no place like home, Magnum

Bringing together works by Magnum photographers including Martin Parr, Alec Soth and Alessandra Sanguinetti, this online exhibition reflects on the notion of home as a central place for solace, security and creativity. It also explores how the home can engender optimism and happiness during times of hardship or uncertainty.

There’s a rich mix to sink your teeth into. Antoine d’Agata’s critically-acclaimed series Virus, in which he documents the devastating impact of the Covid-19 outbreak in Paris, evokes the anguish and fear experienced by millions over the past year. Bruce Gilden’s iconic black-and-white image of a woman in a bikini, on the other hand, is likely to raise a smile.

Don’t miss Peter Marlow’s poetic images spotlighting the loneliness of elderly people and Harry Gruyaert’s lively compositions of public celebrations from the early 1980s. All of this and more at the click of a mouse. Sounds like just the thing to while away those extended summer lunch breaks!




Share story
Dates
19 May 2021 — 31 December 2021
Further information

Viewing Ken Nwadiogbu: Journey Mercies, The Bomb Factory Art Foundation

Nigerian artist Ken Nwadiogbu is the subject of a new solo show at The Bomb Factory Art Foundation in London. Central to the presentation is an installation of stacked cardboard boxes. Each box is painted with the face of someone the artist has met on his travels.

For Nwadiogbu, it is a metaphor for global trade and the migrant experience: ‘Our individual lives may be self-contained but, essentially, we stand on each other’s shoulders journeying to a different continent and bringing with us values that shape the culture and ideas of these spaces’.

Painted in vibrant colours, the boxes stack in a way that references traditional African woven fabrics, while the title of the exhibition pays homage to the Nigerian custom of saying prayers for a traveller about to embark on a long journey.

‘Journey Mercies highlights the struggles and joys, gains and losses of Migration,’ explains the artist. ‘This is particularly applicable to those of us with dreams, values and hope who flee our countries due to the insecurity, lack of infrastructure, and scarcity. But the stacked structures we build are intact. The communities are rich with diversity and beauty.’

Share story
Dates
08 July 2021 — 25 July 2021
Further information

Viewing Paula Rego, Tate Britain

Paul Rego has made her name telling tales on canvas. ‘I always need a story,’ she said. ‘Without a story, I can’t get going.’ Thrillingly for Londoners, many of her most powerful visual narratives are now on show at Tate Britain in the largest UK retrospective of her work to date.

Spanning all six decades of her boundary-breaking career, this exhibition sheds light on her extraordinary imagination, tireless experimentation with styles and media, and commitment to denouncing socio-political injustices.

Take Interrogation (1950), for instance, a torrid canvas depicting a woman cowering at the hands of her torturers, which she painted aged 15 under the Estado Novo, the brutal dictatorship led by António de Oliveira Salazar. Then there’s Salazar Vomiting the Homeland (1960), a grotesque later response to the repression of living under the Portuguese regime.

But it also explores her lifelong preoccupation with the female experience: betrayal, domestic abuse, motherhood, obedience in marriage and abortion are among the powerful themes she brazenly confronts. Dog Woman (1994), in which a woman snarls on all fours, is a standout highlight.

A blend of the personal, universal and mythical, Rego’s art is raw and unflinching. It can be frustratingly difficult to decipher at times but persevere and you’ll be spectacularly rewarded.

Share story
Dates
07 July 2021 — 24 October 2021
Further information
READ MORE
The Wick - Gianna Dispenza (Puiyee Won)
Spotlight

Feature Gianna Dispenza explores the female sitter

Visual Arts
The Wick - Half-Pint T-Shirt, Script x Charming Baker
Objects of Desire

Fashion Half-Pint T-shirt, Charming Baker x Script collaboration

Design, Fashion, Visual Arts
The Wick - Mika Tajima: Regulation at Simon Lee Gallery

Art D'Ameublement Karake
The Wick List

Viewing Mika Tajima, Regulation at Simon Lee Gallery

Visual Arts
The Wick - Time Takes a Cigarette, Josh Lilley Gallery
The Wick List

Viewing Time Takes a Cigarette at Josh Lilley Gallery

Visual Arts
The Wick - Untitled 2020
The Wick List

Viewing Idris Khan, The Seasons Turn at Victoria Miro

Visual Arts
The Wick - A sleeping guy in the meadow 2021
The Wick List

Viewing dear moon by Shota Nakaruma at Peres Projects

Happenings, Travel